I don’t know any men who think, Oh, but the noble thing is to try to not share my work, or to make sure it’s only shared with a certain niche of people. I only know girls and women who talk themselves out of aiming to be successful with this belief that it’s somehow more pure. So I appreciate that you don’t do that, and you do hear a bit of that inner back and forth in songs like “Bravado.”

———-

"A couple of months ago I was performing on Jimmy Fallon and doing heaps of press for my record and someone said to me, “If it’s just about making music for you, why do you bother with any of this?” Which is like a classic…I don’t know if anyone would say that to a dude, but whatever. I was like, “I actually really care about this record, and I want people to hear it.” But, yeah, it’s a weird thing to realize that you shouldn’t be ashamed of wanting your stuff to do well. I definitely had that experience."

— Super Heroine: An Interview With Lorde
http://www.rookiemag.com/2014/01/lorde-interview/

"Girls" on Gawker

I was on Hannah’s side until I saw the site run a photo of a child hit by a car to make some big point about Uber …..

————

Hannah: Gawker is reporting that they won’t be releasing the toxicology report, so we’re not going to know…

Adam: Gawker?

Hannah: Yeah.

Adam: You’re getting your news from Gawker?

Hannah: They report on media, and I’m a media-ist so it’s where I’ve gotta get my news.

Adam: Okay, when you die, how would you feel if a bunch of judgmental creeps, celibate against their will, snarkily reported on every fucking detail of your body decomposing.

Hannah: Well that’s not what’s happening here. This is a very very nice eulogy. Listen: “Goings, Goings, gone. David Goings, publishing’s most flamboyant power player, makes a waterlogged exit worthy of a Bret Easton Ellis character.”

Adam: That’s fucked Hannah. Those are a bunch of jealous people that make a living appealing to our basest desire to see each other kicked while we’re down.

Hannah: I don’t agree, okay? It is a web portal that celebrates the written word. And its sister site Jezebel is a place where feminists can go to support one another, which we need in this modern world full of slut shaming and…

Adam: Well I think that shit gets into your head and makes you one of the bad guys.

Hannah: Well I think you need a place where you can gather up the information that is relevant to your industry and then discuss it with other like-minded indivudals. That’s why the comments board is so important to me and that’s why I’ve made so many e-friends. Why are we fighting about this?

Random Startup Ideas

- “Money & Messages” : kiosks installed in homeless shelters that let guests communicate with family through simple email system and receive money on preloaded cards (with restrictions - food, meds, etc). By using machine to check for funds, guests are agreeing to let family know their current location. Service fee on money transfers split with shelters.

- “Who googles Better?” Multi player trivia game where goal is to google your way to the correct answer quicker than opponent. Bonus points for not falling for highly ranked but factually incorrect links. Scoreboard ranks winners by devices, OS’s, location too. (Androids vs iPhones!)

- GeoJobs: location-based, passive job search engine. Only one button to get started: on or off. Using LinkedIn data and skills/endorsements/keywords etc., mobile app pings you when you’re in a location (a business, walking nearby, visiting a friend at work, etc.) which is hiring for position matching your skill set. HR manger gets real-time alerts (for hard to fill positions!) , can message you in app to drop by and say hi while there. Practical for “normals” too: by scouring job ads (eg like Indeed.com) can tell you if restaurant needs waitstaff, local retailer is hiring salespeople, etc.

- GymCookie: MyFitnessPal-like calorie tracking app where you enter in the equipment you’re about to get on (treadmill, bike, etc.) at gym, and it tells you the settings you need to configure to match your goal (lose 10 lbs) or how to correct your failings that day (ate 2 cookies, eg)

- InstaNanny: subscription-based babysitting service. Like Care.com in terms of vetting sitters, but instead of having to contact sitters, check schedules, arrange times, etc., you just “push a button” and sitter would arrive in 30-60? mins. to take the job. Uber-like rating system + ability to block sitters you didn’t like so won’t be matched again + favorite ones you do like to make algorithm better. Could work outside major metro markets too! (Possible spinoff: InstaPetNanny)

- 10 Minute Books: stay a part of water cooler gossip without having to actually read drivel like “50 Shades…” Gives you the Reader’s Digest Condensed version, some notable quotes, and talking points / discussion starters. Bundle with actual eBook and audiobook subscriptions so people can waste time reading/listening to books they really like (which might also possibly be “50 Shades…”)

The importance of education can never be understated. 
(via 2014 Gates Annual Letter: Myths About Foreign Aid - Gates Foundation) 
"In a recent study of 30 developing countries, women with no schooling had three more children on average than women who attended high school. When women are empowered with knowledge and skills, they start to change their minds about the kind of future they want.
I recently spent an afternoon with a woman named Sadi Seyni, who scratches out a living for five children on an arid farm in a desert region of Niger. She didn’t know about contraceptives when she got married as a teenager. Now she knows, and she’s spacing her pregnancies several years apart, to protect her health and the health of her newborns. I visited the place where she learned about family planning: her village’s well, where women go to talk. And talk. And talk. While we were telling stories, a young bride came to get water. Through a translator, this girl told me that her pregnancies were “God’s will” and therefore out of her control. Sadi suggested that as long as this girl keeps coming to the well and listening, she’ll change her view over time. Even the informal education that happens when a little knowledge spreads among friends transforms the way people think about what’s possible.
Like millions of women in sub-Saharan Africa, Sadi didn’t know about contraceptives when she got married.
It is important to note that the desire to plan is only part of the equation; women need access to contraceptives to follow through on their plan. Sadi lives a stone’s throw away from a health clinic, but it doesn’t carry the contraceptive injections she prefers. She has to walk 10 miles every three months to get her shots. Sadi is incensed, as she should be, about how difficult it is for her to care for her family. Many women like Sadi have no information about planning their pregnancies in a healthy way—and no access to contraceptives. More than 200 million women say they don’t want to be pregnant but aren’t using contraceptives. These women are being robbed of opportunities to decide how to raise their families. And because they can’t determine how many children to have or when to have them, they also have a harder time feeding them, paying for medical care, or sending them to school. It’s a vicious cycle of poverty.”

The importance of education can never be understated. 

(via 2014 Gates Annual Letter: Myths About Foreign Aid - Gates Foundation) 

"In a recent study of 30 developing countries, women with no schooling had three more children on average than women who attended high school. When women are empowered with knowledge and skills, they start to change their minds about the kind of future they want.

I recently spent an afternoon with a woman named Sadi Seyni, who scratches out a living for five children on an arid farm in a desert region of Niger. She didn’t know about contraceptives when she got married as a teenager. Now she knows, and she’s spacing her pregnancies several years apart, to protect her health and the health of her newborns. I visited the place where she learned about family planning: her village’s well, where women go to talk. And talk. And talk. While we were telling stories, a young bride came to get water. Through a translator, this girl told me that her pregnancies were “God’s will” and therefore out of her control. Sadi suggested that as long as this girl keeps coming to the well and listening, she’ll change her view over time. Even the informal education that happens when a little knowledge spreads among friends transforms the way people think about what’s possible.

Like millions of women in sub-Saharan Africa, Sadi didn’t know about contraceptives when she got married.

It is important to note that the desire to plan is only part of the equation; women need access to contraceptives to follow through on their plan. Sadi lives a stone’s throw away from a health clinic, but it doesn’t carry the contraceptive injections she prefers. She has to walk 10 miles every three months to get her shots. Sadi is incensed, as she should be, about how difficult it is for her to care for her family. Many women like Sadi have no information about planning their pregnancies in a healthy way—and no access to contraceptives. More than 200 million women say they don’t want to be pregnant but aren’t using contraceptives. These women are being robbed of opportunities to decide how to raise their families. And because they can’t determine how many children to have or when to have them, they also have a harder time feeding them, paying for medical care, or sending them to school. It’s a vicious cycle of poverty.”